9th Annual Obesity Research Incubator Session
1:00 - 4:15 PM ET | Friday, May 14th, 2021
Virtual

Check back soon to learn how to access the interactive poster session!

The Cardiovascular, Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders (CVDM) Research Center cordially invites you to participate in its 9th annual obesity incubator session. The goal of this session is to bring together BWH clinicians and researchers working in the fields of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease to address this challenging public health crisis by promoting cross-collaborative research efforts and stimulating new ideas for further investigation.

To promote vibrant scientific discussions, the plenary session will feature short talks by selected junior investigators in the field of obesity research, followed by a keynote presentation from Frank A.J.L. Scheer, PhD, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and the Director of the Medical Chronobiology Program (MCP) at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), Boston. Dr. Scheer’s work focuses on influences of the endogenous circadian system and its disruption—such as with shift work—on cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic regulation and disease states, including hypertension, asthma, obesity and diabetes.

 

Agenda

TBA

Call for Abstracts

Deadline is Monday, April 19, 2020

To promote vibrant scientific discussions, stimulate new research and connect researchers from all Boston area institutions, faculty with a rank of assistant professor and below and all non-faculty researchers are invited to submit an abstract to share their work by giving a short talk or presenting a poster.

Abstracts in any area of basic, clinical, translational or epidemiological research related to obesity are welcome.
Preference will be given to abstracts describing early stage ideas, novel hypotheses and preliminary or current work and in obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Abstracts that are not selected for talks will by default be considered for inclusion in the poster session, which will be displayed on electronic poster boards.

Successful applicants MUST be available to talk or present a poster at the virtual Obesity Research Incubator Session on May 14th.

Additional Rules and Information:

  • Prizes of $250-$500 will be awarded to all speakers and selected posters.
  • Talks and Posters selected for presentation will be notified by April 26, 2021.
  • Abstracts must be submitted by Monday, April 19, 2021.
  • Previously presented research is acceptable for both short talks and posters.

About the Keynote

Frank A.J.L. Scheer, PhD is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and the Director of the Medical Chronobiology Program (MCP) at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), Boston. Dr. Scheer’s work focuses on influences of the endogenous circadian system and its disruption—such as with shift work—on cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic regulation and disease states, including hypertension, asthma, obesity and diabetes. Since 2005, Dr. Scheer has been funded continuously as Principal Investigator by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Scheer has received numerous scientific awards, including the Young Investigator Award by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, the Neal Miller Award by the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research, and the Outstanding Scientific Achievement Award by the Sleep Research Society. Dr. Scheer is an Editorial Board Member of several peer-reviewed journals, is an Associate Editor at the journal SLEEP, and is a Member the Board of Directors of the Sleep Research Society.

Dr. Scheer co-founded and currently directs the MCP, an interdisciplinary research program at BWH to foster the translational research in sleep and circadian biology to understand the basis behind time-variant changes in disease severity, the effects of circadian misalignment (typical in night shift workers), and their interaction with genetics (e.g., the common MTNR1B variant). Understanding the biological basis of these changes across the day and night and their interaction with genetics may help in the development of personalized and time-based behavioral, environmental, and pharmaceutical interventions (e.g. appropriately timed meals, exercise or melatonin to target specific phases of the body clock) to prevent, treat, and/or manage disease.

Are you presenting a poster?

We’ve put together some resources for you to use including logos, templates and resource guides about how to create the best poster for the Poster Session.

More information will be forth coming. 

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